Le Somnambule, Oeuvres posthumes en prose et en vers, ou…

Le Somnambule, Oeuvres posthumes en prose et en vers, ou l’on trouve L’histoire générale d’une Isle très-singulière, découverte aux grandes Indes en 1784. by [BEAUHARNAIS, Fanny, comtesse de, attributed to]. < >
  • Another image of Le Somnambule, Oeuvres posthumes en prose et en vers, ou l’on trouve L’histoire générale d’une Isle très-singulière, découverte aux grandes Indes en 1784. by [BEAUHARNAIS, Fanny, comtesse de, attributed to].
  • Another image of Le Somnambule, Oeuvres posthumes en prose et en vers, ou l’on trouve L’histoire générale d’une Isle très-singulière, découverte aux grandes Indes en 1784. by [BEAUHARNAIS, Fanny, comtesse de, attributed to].
  • Another image of Le Somnambule, Oeuvres posthumes en prose et en vers, ou l’on trouve L’histoire générale d’une Isle très-singulière, découverte aux grandes Indes en 1784. by [BEAUHARNAIS, Fanny, comtesse de, attributed to].
  • Another image of Le Somnambule, Oeuvres posthumes en prose et en vers, ou l’on trouve L’histoire générale d’une Isle très-singulière, découverte aux grandes Indes en 1784. by [BEAUHARNAIS, Fanny, comtesse de, attributed to].

~ Le Somnambule, Oeuvres posthumes en prose et en vers, ou l’on trouve L’histoire générale d’une Isle très-singulière, découverte aux grandes Indes en 1784. ‘L’Isle de France; et se trouve a Paris’ [Paris]: Didot, 1786.

8vo (205 × 135 mm), pp. [2], vi, 312. Woodcut device to title. Uncut in contemporary blue pastepaper wrappers. Rubbed, but an appealing copy.

First edition, usually attributed to Fanny de Beauharnais, the popular salon host and aunt by marriage to the future Empress Joséphine. A collection of essays, a novella, a dramatic piece and several poems, it derives its name from the contemporary vogue for ‘somnabulism’ or mesmerism, popular in the last quarter of the century in spite of the rationalism of the so-called Enlightenment.

Apart from the comedy Les Illuminés, an overt satire on mesmerism, the most interesting part is the utopian novella, Relation très-véritable d’une île nouvellement découvert. A young chevalier, a collector of natural history speciments and other curios, take a trip to the Indes in search of the wisdom of the Brahmins. He takes an aerostatic balloon with him and finds himself on a desert island (’L’Île des Coctoiers’) of which he makes an aerial survey. It is inhabited only by women and girls, whose rank appears to be denoted by the possession, respectively, of hair or feathers. He is willingly captured by some of them, who believe him to be one of their own kind, not knowing the meaning of ‘man’ or ‘woman’. He is taken to their leader, where it becomes apparent that not only do they have no concept of sex or gender, nor concomitantly of happiness or sadness. They each live for many hundreds of years, and their queen is periodally reborn, phoenix-like. Though charmed by the beauty of the islanders, the chevalier soon tires of the monotony of their lives and sails away in his balloon.

Not in fact posthumous, the entire framing of the book is ironic and satirical, and the author claims it to have been written by a friend in a state of somnambulism under a specially magnetised tree in the Champs Elysées, giving a peculiarly acute insight into the secrets of the hearts of men: ‘Mon plus intime ami, dont je donne ici l’ouvrage,... le hasard le conduisit sous cet arbre merveilleux où il s’assit. Mon ami se trouva dans un état de bonheur dont lui seul pourrait rendre compte...)Il voit, depuis ce moment, tous les corps diaphanes, et pénètre les plus secrètes pensées ; mais je n'en abuse pas de peur d'augmenter le nombre de divorces.... Je pourrais indiquer l'arbre en question; mais tout bien calculé, je crois qu'il ne faut pas que les hommes en général, et les maris en particulier, deviennent trop pénétrans [sic]; peut-être ferait-on bien de demander la permission d'abattre cet arbre.’ (Avertissement) Barbier, IV, p. 525; Cioranescu 10294 (’fausse attribution’).

Print this page View basket Price: £650.00