Miscellaneous Pieces, in Prose and Verse; by Charles Graham, Writing-Master…

Miscellaneous Pieces, in Prose and Verse; by Charles Graham, Writing-Master And Teacher Of The English Language, Liverpool. by GRAHAM, Charles.
  • Another image of Miscellaneous Pieces, in Prose and Verse; by Charles Graham, Writing-Master And Teacher Of The English Language, Liverpool. by GRAHAM, Charles.
  • Another image of Miscellaneous Pieces, in Prose and Verse; by Charles Graham, Writing-Master And Teacher Of The English Language, Liverpool. by GRAHAM, Charles.
  • Another image of Miscellaneous Pieces, in Prose and Verse; by Charles Graham, Writing-Master And Teacher Of The English Language, Liverpool. by GRAHAM, Charles.

~ Miscellaneous Pieces, in Prose and Verse; by Charles Graham, Writing-Master And Teacher Of The English Language, Liverpool. Liverpool: Printed by T. Schofield, for the author, and sold by the booksellers. 1793.

12mo (174 × 96 mm), pp. 193, [1], with subscribers’ list and folding engraved frontispiece; lightly browned throughout; modern half morocco to style by Philip Dusel.

First edition, with an otherwise apparently unrecorded engraved plate bound as a frontispiece. Though having the same title as that of a preceding Kendal edition, this is actually a completely new collection, with only a few repeated articles (enough to assure us that Graham of Kendal is the same individual as Graham of Liverpool), including the essay on cock-fighting. In this 1793 collection, Graham advertises his occupation as writing-master through the elegant engraved plate (by Ashby of London) and the verse ‘On the Arts of Penmanship and Engraving’. Graham also notes in his preface ‘Some of the Poems were written during our unhappy contest with the Americans, and have some allusion thereto; but I trust, no person will take offence on this account: my remarks are of the pacific kind; being sensible that devastation and slaughter; are incompatible with the Christian name.’ The long poem ‘Columbus, or the Discovery of America’ is offered, with a prose introduction, to mark the three-hundredth anniversary of the voyage of Columbus. It ends with a reference to the construction of Washington, with the footnote: ‘The New City of Washington, now Erecting, intended to be the Capital of the United States.’ Not in Jackson; not in Johnson; not in Sabin. Scarce: ESTC: BL, Liverpool, Mitchell Library, Bodley, UC Berkeley and UCLA. Of these, none has the engraved plate, and several lack the list of subscribers.

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