Specimens of Arabian Poetry, from the earliest Time to the…

Specimens of Arabian Poetry, from the earliest Time to the Extinction of the Khaliphat, with some Account of the Authors, by J. D. Carlyle, B.D. F.R.S.E. Chancellor of Carlisle, and Professor of Arabic in the University of Cambridge. by CARLYLE, Joseph Dacre.
  • Another image of Specimens of Arabian Poetry, from the earliest Time to the Extinction of the Khaliphat, with some Account of the Authors, by J. D. Carlyle, B.D. F.R.S.E. Chancellor of Carlisle, and Professor of Arabic in the University of Cambridge. by CARLYLE, Joseph Dacre.
  • Another image of Specimens of Arabian Poetry, from the earliest Time to the Extinction of the Khaliphat, with some Account of the Authors, by J. D. Carlyle, B.D. F.R.S.E. Chancellor of Carlisle, and Professor of Arabic in the University of Cambridge. by CARLYLE, Joseph Dacre.
  • Another image of Specimens of Arabian Poetry, from the earliest Time to the Extinction of the Khaliphat, with some Account of the Authors, by J. D. Carlyle, B.D. F.R.S.E. Chancellor of Carlisle, and Professor of Arabic in the University of Cambridge. by CARLYLE, Joseph Dacre.
  • Another image of Specimens of Arabian Poetry, from the earliest Time to the Extinction of the Khaliphat, with some Account of the Authors, by J. D. Carlyle, B.D. F.R.S.E. Chancellor of Carlisle, and Professor of Arabic in the University of Cambridge. by CARLYLE, Joseph Dacre.
  • Another image of Specimens of Arabian Poetry, from the earliest Time to the Extinction of the Khaliphat, with some Account of the Authors, by J. D. Carlyle, B.D. F.R.S.E. Chancellor of Carlisle, and Professor of Arabic in the University of Cambridge. by CARLYLE, Joseph Dacre.

~ Specimens of Arabian Poetry, from the earliest Time to the Extinction of the Khaliphat, with some Account of the Authors, by J. D. Carlyle, B.D. F.R.S.E. Chancellor of Carlisle, and Professor of Arabic in the University of Cambridge. Cambridge: Printed by John Burges printer to the University; and sold by W. H. Lunn and J. Deighton, Cambridge; T. Payne & Son... B. & J. White, Fleet Street; R. Faulder... and J. Sewell... London; and Fletcher and Cooke, Oxford. 1796.

4to (232 × 180 mm), pp. [4], ix, [3], 71, [1], 1-48, [3], 49-180, text in Arabic and English, one page of engraved music, ornamental tailpieces throughout; lately rebound to style in calf, gilt.

Second edition (first 1795, of 3 which copies only are recorded in ESTC). The poems are printed in both English and Arabic and there is one engraved musical example of the work of Ishaq al-Mawsili (‘Isaac Almousely’ 767-850): ‘Arab musician of Persian origin... a court musician... an upholder of the classical Arab music style,... [who] provided Arab music with a theoretical system based on local traditions...’ (New Grove).

Carlyle entered Christ's College, Cambridge in 1775, moving to Queens' College in 1778. ‘During his residence at Cambridge he profited from the instructions of a native of Baghdad, who passed in Britain under the name David Zamio. As a result, Carlyle became so proficient in oriental languages that he was appointed professor of Arabic on the resignation of Dr Craven in 1795. In 1793 he had succeeded William Paley as chancellor of Carlisle. In 1792 he published Rerum Aegyptiacarum annales, translated from the Arabic of Yusuf ibn Taghri Birdi. Four years later there appeared his well-respected translation, Specimens of Arabian Poetry (which included biographical sketches of selected authors)’ (Oxford DNB). In 1799 he was appointed chaplain to Lord Elgin's mission to Constantinople and travelled extensively through Asia Minor, Palestine, Greece, and Italy, collecting Greek and Syriac manuscripts for a proposed new version of the New Testament. Jackson, p. 214.

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